Dr. Wojnowski’s life-long passion for reptiles and amphibians, especially snakes, was enhanced by growing up in Tucson in the beautiful Sonoran Desert. One of his primary research interests is teacher’s perceptions of herpetofauna and the situational aspects of interaction based on knowledge, experience and culture. Dr. Wojnowski is also intrigued at how conceptual understanding of science concepts may influence curricular and pedagogical decisions made by educators.

During his doctoral studies at Kent State University, Dr. Wojnowski traveled to East Africa where he lived and worked with rural Kenyan teachers as he investigated their perceptions of snakes. While at the University of North Texas he continued his research in Kenya and co-facilitated a conference in Uganda entitled, Sustainable Tourism and Environmental Education: A Natural Link, as well as teaching undergraduate and graduate courses including project-based instruction, science methods, effective teaching and learning, and conceptual models of learning and instruction.

Now at Georgia State University, Dr. Wojnowski has continued working in Uganda partnering with the Bishop Willis Core Primary Teachers College’s Active Teaching and Learning initiative. As GSU’s Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Education STEM endorsement program coordinator he teaches science methods, project-based learning and integrated science courses, as well as graduate level courses in the science endorsement program and a research seminar course for doctoral students.

“I hope that my work with Save the Snakes will afford me new opportunities to continue my life-long efforts to educate people and communities about the importance of sustainable practices and the harmonious coexistence of humans and snakes.”